SAGA Builds Scandinavia’s Largest 3D Printed Circular House – Revealed by 3DPrinting.com


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SAGA has recently completed the construction of Scandinavia’s largest 3D printed circular house in Brondby. This community house, a collaboration between AKF, a prominent Danish real estate developer, and 3DCP Group, spans an area of 75 square meters. Its unique design takes inspiration from the adjacent “Kirkebjerg” lake near Copenhagen. The multifunctional structure houses a fitness center, laundry room, and playground, providing a variety of facilities for the community.

“3D printing is a flexible construction method where material is added strictly where necessary. The process determines the amount of material to be used in different parts of the construction, making it feasible to create buildings where concrete is only added where it is structurally required,” explained AKF, one of the collaborators of the project.

“This approach can lead to a substantial decrease in resource usage, potentially resulting in significant environmental and economic benefits, while offering more freedom in the architectural design of the building.”

COBOD
Actual construction of the house, completed with COBOD machines.
(Image Credit: SAGA)

To that end, innovative building materials were employed in the construction of the rotund structure, particularly low CO2 cement combined with local sand and gravel, utilizing the D.fab admixtures method developed by Cemex and COBOD.

Vibeke Lorenzen, AKF’s technical director, emphasized the potential of 3D printing to transform traditional construction methods. Similarly, Mikkel Brich (CEO of 3DCP), highlighted the technology’s reliability, speed, and precision.

The completion of this 3D printed structure in Scandinavia showcases the efficiency and versatility of 3D printing technology in large-scale projects, potentially leading to its wider adoption in the construction sector. This trend may drive further innovation and sustainability in building designs, offering new avenues for architectural expression and environmental responsibility.

Source: parametric-architecture.com

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